Book Review: The Djinn Falls in Love & Other Stories.

The Djinn Falls in Love & Other Stories – Edited by Mahvesh Murad and Jared Shurin (Solaris 2017)

I love the variety and surprises that short story collections often bring.  I was intrigued by this book which aims to showcase global storytelling and to showcase the djinn (alternatively jinn or genie) as an element of folklore with “immense contemporary” relevance.

The stories are written in a variety of styles.  Classic fairy tales, fantasy, science fiction and ‘weird’ feature amongst others.  Many of the writers bring contemporary issues into focus through a lens of magic.

I’ll highlight a few of the stories that stood out:

The Congregation by Kamila Shamsie – This has a traditional feel and is about a boy, fathered by a jinn, who wishes to feel whole again by being possessed by his jinn brother.  There is a lovely line it where a character says “There is no evil here, only love.  God save us from a world that can’t tell the difference.”

Hurrem and the Djinn by Claire North – Tells a tale of the Sultan’s favourite lady who is believed to be a witch.  It’s about the suspicion and rumour that dogs women of influence and the hatred they face.

Glass Lights by J.Y YangThis is a lovely story of Mena, a Muslim girl who was told by her grandfather that she is a djinn.  Mena quietly helps others without expectations.  It is a tale of everyday life, passing encounters with strangers and the mundanity and randomness of the working day.

A Tale of Ash in Seven Birds by Amal El-Mohtar – The immigrant experience is writ large in this tale.  We are told that “Nations are great magicians; they pull borders out of hats like knots of silk.  Here, says the wizard nation, here are the terms of a truce: be small, be drab, above all be grateful, and we will let you in.”  This is a prose piece rather than a straightforward story.

Reap by Sami Shah – US based drone operatives spend long shifts watching and analysing a small village in Pakistan.  Through heat signatures and movements they watch a supernatural horror unfold.  Tense and very effective.

Message in a Bottle by K.J. Parker – Witty and mediaeval in style.  Some of the dialogue is a bit too contemporary to fit in comfortably but an excellent story nevertheless.

Bring Your Own Spoon by Saad Z. Hossain – Great dystopian sci-fi about the poor and dispossessed.  A Djinn, a cook and a smuggler set up a kitchen and shelter to provide for the poorest.  Well written.  The descriptions of the simple meals cooked made my mouth water.

Somewhere in America by Neil Gaiman – Taken from his novel American Gods.  This is just excellent.  Funny, explicit, moving and empathetic.  It works as a standalone short story.

Overall an engaging, though provoking collection.

 

 

 

 

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Book Review: The Mindworm (Tandem Books – 1967)

The subtitle of this book is ‘A collection of the best science fiction stories’.  If we remove the words ‘the best’, then I would agree.

These stories are fairly old, the collection was first published in 1952.  Styles change, ideas change, society moves on.  Most of this is irretrievably bad with some stories that poke their heads above the gutter like rats before a foray to the bins.

I’ll give you an idea of what we’re dealing with:

‘Not to be opened’ by Roger Flint Young is a ridiculous story about an ego being sent from the future to build weapons to defeat a future dictator.  I really don’t know how this was ever published.  Much of the narrative concerns manufacturing, logistics and the transport of mechanical parts.  Honestly, it’s like the author sat down, put pen to paper and handed it in to the printers.  I can’t believe there was an editor involved let alone any editing by the author himself.

‘The Santa Claus Planet’ by Frank M Robinson is about a planet of primitives, a game of capitalist brinkmanship and has a pay-off line that makes no sense.  Just awful.

‘The Mindworm’ by Cyril Kornbluth is not a terrible tale but displays an old-fashioned carelessly sexist and racist attitude that would not pass muster today.  The story is of a boy affected by radiation who feeds off extremes of emotional stress from others, killing them in the process.

Another story that is not irredeemably dreadful is ‘Process’ by A.E. van Vogt.  It tells the story of survival on the fittest on a grand scale  It is an allegory of the cold war and environmental destruction.

‘Trespass’ by Paul Anderson and Gordon Dickson is inventive and amusing.  It features a time-traveller with an odd but endearing manner of speech trying to fight for his rights to move historical artefacts through time.

The final story, ‘Two Face’ by Frank Belknap Long felt like an insult.  I’d be ashamed if I wrote anything that bad.

I suspect that few people will feel the need to hunt out this book after reading this review but, if you are curious, I will happily let you have my copy.