Book Review – The Caltraps of Time by David I Masson ( Gollancz – 2012)

On initial inspection of this book, I really liked the idea of it.  It’s in the SF Masterworks series, it represents all of the published short stories of a writer I’ve never heard of and it has a great title. (I had no idea what a Caltrap was and had to look it up). It seemed to have forgotten classic written all over it.  However, the proof of the book is in the reading and the initial promise evaporated pretty quickly 

Another reviewer has commented that the SF Masterworks series seems to publish everything, which whilst being a tad unfair does raise an interesting question about quality control and who actually regards the titles in the series as classics.  

In the first story, Traveller’s Rest’ a soldier is relieved from front line duty in some hideous war where no-man’s land appears to be a rip in space-time.  It quickly becomes obvious that time moves faster at the front line than at the rear.  The main characters’ name gets longer the further he gets from the front and the prose also becomes more descriptive.  I quite enjoyed the story even though the pay-off at the end was a bit obvious.  

‘A Two Timer’ tells the story of a man from 1683 who stumbles across a time machine and jumps into 1964.  The use of archaic period English is quite nice but Masson stretches the point of how an Elizabethan would be amazed by 20th century technology a bit thin.  

Masson was clearly interested by language, the introduction points out that he was fascinated by

The functions and effects of phonetic sound patterning.

This interest s clear in ‘Not So Certain’, which is a rather tedious exercise in the study of alien language that is resolved by a punchline that was not with the effort of reading the story.  

Masson’s interest in language means that many of these stories are hard to get to grips with and feel like they were written for his own amusements there than for an audience.  As an example, here is the last line from the story ‘The Transfinite Choice’ (I don’t believe that this can be seen as a spoiler, you’ll see what I mean when you read…)

It was his reality which had been fractionated by infra-hypo-subquark shunt.

Really, it was like trying to read the fitting manual for a gas cooker in a foreign language.

I won’t distract you much further with this review but I will mention the following:

  • Psychosmosis – In my notes I have simply written ‘What?’
  • The Show Must Go On – A SF satire in which the author grumbles about how modern life is rubbish. I suspect it would have been more amusing in the 1970’s.
  • Doctor Fausta- More time travel explained in tortuous fashion and a truly dreadful ‘Bizarro world’ set up.

Whilst I would admire attempts to bring true great works to a wider audience, this volume proves that not everything that is old and has been out of print for a long time is a ‘classic’.  This would have been best forgotten.  Claptrap of Time.